GMT Time Now

GMT Time Now






The Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is a reference point for the Prime Meridian as well as a time zone. The United Kingdom runs on British Summer Time (BST) during summer and GMT only during winter. There are so many variations on standard time and the different types of time zones which make it difficult to keep track of them all. That is the reason why the GMT has always been the reference point when you want to determine the time difference. It does not have any offset from the Universal Coordinated Time (UTC). Instead, it is a time zone used in Antarctica, North America, Europe, and Africa.

An equivalent title to the Greenwich Mean Time is the Universal Time, abbreviated as (UT). It is one of the concepts used in various technical fields. The British Summer time has always been used during the summer months. The time is usually one hour ahead of the GMT during these months. GMT becomes the legal time in Britain during the winter months. Noon is rarely the moment when the sun traverses the Greenwich Meridian despite being a solar time. The sun's highest point may extend up to 16 minutes away from noon in some cases measured in GMT. The ‘M' stands for ‘mean' in the title because this time is the annual average for the event.